Tag: motivates your characters

motion map

Creating A Motion Map Of Your Story

Great writing is all about great motion and change — and every bit of motion needs a motivation. You can track these cycles by creating a motion map.
develop your story

Develop Your Story By Listening To Your Cast

You can listen to your cast of characters at any stage in the writing process, but it might be especially useful near the end when most of the story is fleshed out. It can be a good check of your story logic and add a last ingenious layer of polish.
three-dimensional villains

Creating Three-dimensional Villains: Lessons From Buffy and Firefly

When writing your next villain, give him or her as detailed a backstory as your protagonist. TV's Buffy and Firefly provide some great examples of well-developed, three-dimensional villains to use as inspiration.
writing great dialogue

Writing Great Dialogue: Create Power Moments Rich In Subtext

Power moments in your story set up life-changing events and propel your story forward. Writing great dialogue often depends on the subtext you create in setting up these moments.
TV slang

Writing Lessons From TV: Slang Can Help Create Your World

One way to envelop your reader in a new world is to create (or appropriate) slang. Done clumsily, it can detract from your story, but Buffy and Firefly show how slang can add nuance to your story's universe.
writing lessons from Rick and Morty

Writing Lessons From TV: Rick and Morty Revisited

Some of the boldest, most adventurous writing is happening on TV. In this ongoing series, we deliver writing lessons gleaned from our favorite shows airing in the golden age of television.
strong female character

Avoid The Cliché “Strong Female Character”

Readers love a strong female character. Just remember you can be vulnerable, unreliable, uncertain, or even physically weak and still be a strong character.

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