What makes a great BookShop page?A potential reader has landed on your BookShop page by either: * linking from a website, email newsletter, or social. * searching for you, your book, or related subject matter online. Now it's time to make a great first impression, and a sale!

How to optimize your BookShop page to capture the most sales

1. You need a striking book cover It’s the first thing someone sees — because it's HUGE. And that’s good. BookShop puts the attention where it should be, on YOUR book. Hopefully your book cover makes people want to read more about it. If so, well done. If not, you still have time to capture a visitor's imagination when you…

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BookShop: How to sell more eBooksBookShop — the free direct-to-reader sales-tool created by BookBaby to help independent authors sell more eBooks

In a nutshell, BookShop is your eBook's online home; it provides you with a webpage for your book AND a robust ecommerce solution all in one place. All your book's vital info is showcased within BookShop's elegant design; BookShop takes just minutes to set up; and you can make updates whenever you want. That being said, it's not like you're going to just turn the switch and start selling millions of eBooks through BookShop overnight (unless you already have millions of readers eagerly awaiting your next release). Yes, BookShop makes your job as an author easier (allowing you to streamline some of your promotional and retail efforts), but it can't do all the work for you. That's why we put together this list of ways to make sure you're getting the most out of BookShop — because when you're promoting your book effectively, we want you to be set up to capture every sale possible.

12 ways to boost your book sales with BookShop

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Book sales timeline in traditional vs. self-publishing'Hurry up and wait,' or 'wait and hurry up?'

That's an authors choice when it comes to publishing paths, according to an article called "The Business Rusch: Hurry Up. Wait." by fiction writer and blogger Kristine Kathryn Rusch. Self-publishing involves a lot of upfront scrambling (finishing the book, editing, cover design, distribution, etc.). Then you wait, and wait, and wait for sales — sales which trickle in month-by-month but that may add up to significant revenue in the long-run. Indie authors need patience and must understand that they're building a readership by word-of-mouth, one person at a time. Because eBooks have no shelf-life (or more accurately, their shelf-life is forever), the smartest thing an indie author can do to increase sales is to write the NEXT book. Traditional publishing is an almost completely opposite model. You do all the waiting upfront (months or years to place the book in the hands of an editor or agent, months to negotiate the contracts, many more months to put the book and marketing plan together, even more months of pre-publication promo/publicity work, and then finally the big day arrives when your book is released to the public). Now comes the rush! Your success, in the eyes of your publisher, is based on your pre-sales in the months leading up to your launch and your sales for the first 1-3 months after your launch. Those numbers will determine whether you...

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If you’re a journalist or an author who enjoys writing nonfiction stories, the eBook single represents a new revenue stream for you. In some cases, authors can net more than $100,000* for a 60-page effort.

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Many new self-published authors think they need to have a book launch with lots of fanfare right after they hit the publish button. Actually, you can “launch” your book in the first few months after its official release date.

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Because Amazon is the dominant player in the eBook marketplace, many authors wrongly assume that they should be publishing for Kindle exclusively.

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