Your first draft might be a brain dump, so it's on you to rid subsequent drafts of holes, sleeping pills and imposters. What's your Achilles' heel: tangential, rambling, or missing content?

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If you’re asked to be a fresh eyes reader by a friend or colleague who’s writing a book, you are being given an honor, a privilege, and most important, a responsibility. Don’t take it lightly, but be sure to enjoy it along the way!

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Author/publisher Rochelle Carter joined our August #BBchat to talk about authorpreneurship and how to create an author marketing plan.

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When you read for an author, what do you offer? These eight considerations form a kind of code of conduct that can help a writer and beta reader get the most from one another.

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Your author marketing plan is an overview of your goals for your book and yourself as an author, and you can start developing it before you write your first sentence.

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In an ideal world, your book's beta readers will give you feedback on these eight points. It helps if you ask them for this specific criticism in advance.

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Wikipedia defines a Beta Reader as: “a person who reads a written work, generally fiction, with the aim of improving grammar, spelling, characterization, and general style of a story prior to its release to the general public." In essence, a Beta Reader’s duty is to provide writers with critical feedback to improve their stories. This post by the Canadian Uber Addicts offers a detailed “job description” of a Beta Reader which we have summarized below: A Beta Reader, first and foremost, is there to make sure the story gets better by using a ruthless, critical eye.

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