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What will you do when your eBook sales slow down?

What will you do when your eBook sales slow down?

How to boost book sales when your eBook sales declineSurvey says: print books are here to stay

According to a recent study called ”The Evolution of the Book Industry: Implications for U.S. Book Manufacturers and Printers,” almost 70% of book buyers say they are likely to continue purchasing printed books through 2016. Perhaps more shocking was the finding that 60% of all eBooks that are downloaded in the United States are NEVER read.

Why the fierce loyalty to printed books? Oh, the usual reasons: a “sensory attachment” (as eContent calls it) to the physical item, the desire to place the book on a bookshelf, and the fact that you don’t have to strain your eyes staring at another electronic gadget.

Given the fact that eBook sales were flat in 2013, it seems these benefits are keeping the printed book safe from the extinction that digital publishing pundits have been predicting for years. But what does this mean for you?

3 ways to keep your book sales up as eBook sales slow down

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Creating and publishing a cookbook that sells

Creating and publishing a cookbook that sells

Promoting a cookbookAn interview with Paul McCullough and Jeremy Stanford

We spend lots of time on this blog talking about how to promote and sell eBooks. But we also like to provide tips on how to sell physical books too!

And who better to ask for advice on this topic than successful independent authors who have returned to BookBaby for multiple printings of their book. They’re obviously doing something right, right?

So I recently asked chef Paul McCullough (of the popular boutique catering company Paul’s Kitchen) and director/producer Jeremy Stanford about their collaboration on a cookbook called Roma-therapy, how they attracted attention to their book, how they converted that attention into sales, and the process of designing and printing a cookbook.

They were kind enough to share their story and advice. Here’s that interview:

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BookBaby not affected by Heartbleed

BookBaby not affected by Heartbleed

BookBaby not affected by HeartbleedYou may have heard a lot over the past week about a newly-discovered internet security bug called Heartbleed.

Our IT staff has been keeping track of the Heartbleed flaw since news first broke in security forums, and we wanted to let you know that BookBaby was not affected by this bug. Our systems remain secure and your data, including your financial and login information, is safe.

That being said, this IS a serious bug. While all BookBaby sites are secure, many other sites on the Internet were impacted — and some are still working to make their sites safe. So we think it’s a good idea to change your passwords as soon as possible for ALL sites, regardless of their vulnerability to Heartbleed. 

Yes, we know: MORE passwords to remember!!! Ah, the Internet.

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Why no one is seeing what you post from your Facebook author page

Why no one is seeing what you post from your Facebook author page

Why no one is seeing your author posts on FacebookDo you feel like the posts you’re making from your author page on Facebook are going largely ignored?

You’re not alone. Sure, maybe some of your posts are getting ignored by some of the people who are glancing at them. But there’s a more obvious reason for the dip in your Facebook fans’ engagement; as my friend Brad Bush says, “most of your fans aren’t even getting the chance to ignore your posts, because they never see them in the first place.

Why? Well, Facebook is intentionally limiting the number of fans who see your content. And they’ve admitted that it’s part of their plan to increase those restrictions in an attempt to get you to PAY for further reach (through promoted posts and advertising).

How do you as an independent author get around that?

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Become an award-winning author

Become an award-winning author

Book award

Authors, enter your book today!

There is still time to enter this year’s Readers’ Favorite International Book Award Contest!

Readers’ Favorite is the fastest growing book review and award contest site for authors on the web. Their annual International Book Award Contest receives submissions from contestants that range from first-time self-published authors to New York Times bestsellers like J.A. Jance, James Rollins, and #1 best-selling author Daniel Silva, as well as celebrity authors like Jim Carrey and Henry Winkler.

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Dealing with literary rejection

Dealing with literary rejection

Dealing with Rejection as a WriterA writer that has never been rejected is either a liar or blessed with anomalous luck; and luck is already by its very nature, ya know,… anomalous.

Literary rejection is more than just a professional hazard or rite of passage; it’s something we have to deal with continuously.

Even famous authors get told NO from time to time. But common as it is for writers, rejection still stings! So how do you keep the swelling down?

Here are a handful of articles with advice on how to keep things in perspective and stay productive in the face of rejection:

1. Five ways to get the most out of your rejection letters

2. Dealing with literary rejection: tips from Sarah Fawn Montgomery

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Social media mistakes: don’t be THAT author!

Social media mistakes: don’t be THAT author!

Egotistical writers on Facebook

Are you a Facebook braggart?

I’ve had a  good year getting poems placed in respected publications.

Naturally, I wanted to share my excitement every time on social media (which means Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for me). These are life events on an order of magnitude somewhat greater than “I ate eggs for breakfast this morning” or “I’m listening to my Katy Perry/Mountain Goats mashup again.”

Sharing good news on social media made sense. Plus, we writers are supposed to be promoting ourselves! And I’d be lying if I said there wasn’t a little bit of “hey, look at me — I’m legit” when I cheerfully announced each new acceptance. I mean, we all want validation, and when we get it, we want to show the world, right?

But at a certain point I worried that my updates might look like out-and-out bragging. It’s tough to gauge for friends, fans, and family where the line is between “I’m so happy for you” and “who cares already?”

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Yearning for the vagabond life: a profile of indie author Joanna Penn

Yearning for the vagabond life: a profile of indie author Joanna Penn

Joanna Penn: an indie author profileInterviewing author and speaker Joanna Penn is a lot like reading one of her thrillers—a rollicking ride through uncharted territories where surprises burst from dark corridors and human quirks shape the narrative in unexpected ways.

In the span of less than an hour, I learned that she and I are taphophiles (people who are fascinated by graveyards), her “overnight” success self-publishing ebooks took more than 5 years of hard work, and she envisions a vagabond existence in the future, traveling internationally to inspire her writing, painting verbal pictures of her favorite places (Jerusalem being one), and sparking her imagination by seeking strange and unfamiliar locales.

Joanna is the producer of hundreds of podcasts and video interviews (many available through her site, The Creative Penn), so I was surprised to learn…

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Building a community of writers

Building a community of writers

Building a writing communityA couple years ago I moved from Portland, Oregon to Portland, Maine. (What can I say, I like Portlands!) But despite the identical names, they’re very different cities. I’d been in Oregon for a decade, spent much of that time immersed in the various writing and music scenes, made good friends, and felt well-supported within those communities. Then suddenly I’m in this new place on the other side of the continent with no literary connections — and having to use GPS to get around town too. Ugh!

So I’ve done a lot of thinking over the past two years about literary community, what it means to build or join a community of writers, and why it’s crucial to be a part of such a community. I’ve also done a lot of reaching out; I’ve attended many readings; I’ve joined a writing group that meets monthly; and what do you know, slowly but surely I’ve become a part of a new community of Maine writers that I turn to for mentorship, feedback, or just to grab a drink and talk about books we love.

The solitude that people often experience when they move to a new town can be great for writing. You can be a lot more productive when your social options are limited. But at some point every writer craves that sense of community, or what Daryl Rothman calls a “literary network of resources, opportunity and mutual support which can help take your writing and publishing dreams to the next level.”

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How to “blog a book” and become a successful author (an interview with Nina Amir)

Nina Amir, author of How to Blog a Book and The Author Training Manual, helps writers combine their passion and purpose so they can create works that positively impact the world.

In this interview, Nina provides tips on how to turn your blog into a book, how to position yourself as an expert, and how to build your writing career upon an inspired foundation. 

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